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The National Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation Workshop 2012

Date: 
Wednesday, November 14, 2012 - 13:54 to Thursday, November 15, 2012 - 13:50
Event Type: 

The workshop was held at Ecucha Victoria

I-Tracker officer, Erica McCreedy, recently attended The National Indigenous Knowledge for Climate Change Adaptation Workshop hosted by the Yorta Yorta Nation and Monash University and held in Ecucha, Victoria, on the 14th – 15th November 2012. The workshop brought together Indigenous and non-Indigenous people and organisations from across Australia and the world to discuss the affects of climate change and potential adaptation measures. The workshop focused on how Indigenous knowledge can contribute to climate change adaptation for Indigenous communities and the Australian community in general.

There was a strong focus on combining Indigenous knowledge with western science to achieve better land management outcomes and adapt to the affects of climate change.

Erica presented on NAILSMA’s I-Tracker project as part of the session ‘Building a community archive of Indigenous knowledge’. What methods and tools can Indigenous communities use to collect traditional knowledge as a basis for climate change adaptation?

I-Tracker, an initiative of NAILSMA, provides digital data collection tools through training and resources to Indigenous land and sea managers across northern Australia to help better manage country. With changes in climate and extreme weather events, I-Tracker is a good example of how Indigenous people across northern Australia are collecting, cataloguing and mapping the changes that are occurring on country.

Photo: Erica McCreedy presenting at the workshop with Phil Rist

More information:

Visit the Monash University website for more information about the workshop.

Read about the NAILSMA I-Tracker program

Links

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